What is the Difference Between Theft and Robbery in New Jersey?

What is the Difference Between Theft and Robbery in New Jersey?

When a person steals the property of another party, they can face criminal charges as a result of their actions. The charges that a person faces can vary depending on the situation, as they are not always the same. It is important to know that there is a difference between crimes such as theft and robbery. Continue reading below to learn more about these differences and contact an experienced New Jersey criminal defense attorney if you are facing these charges. 

What is Theft?

In New Jersey, theft of movable property is defined as unlawfully taking or exercising unlawful control of another’s movable property with the intent to deprive the owner. Theft of immovable property is defined as unlawfully transferring any interest in another’s immovable property to benefit themselves or another person who isn’t entitled to them. These crimes can be classified as follows:

  • Disorderly Persons Offense: When the property stolen is valued less than $200. This is a disorderly persons offense and can result in up to 6 months in jail and fines.
  • Fourth Degree Theft: When the stolen property is valued between $200 and $500. This can result in up to 18 months in jail and/or a fine up to $10,000, or double the amount of the victim’s loss.
  • Third Degree Theft: When the stolen property is valued between $500 and $75,000 or it is a firearm, motor vehicle, boat, horse, airplane, or domestic companion animal. This can result in 3-5 years in prison and/or a fine up to $15,000, or double the amount of the victim’s loss.
  • Second Degree Theft: When the stolen property is valued at $75,000 or more; theft by extortion; or, theft of 1 kilogram or more of a controlled substance. This can result in 5 to 10 years in prison and/or a fine up to $150,000, or double the amount of the victim’s loss.

What is Robbery?

In New Jersey, robbery is defined as theft that involves violence, force, or threat of force. There are different degrees of robbery. Most offenses are considered as a second degree offense. However, it can be upgraded to the first degree if the offender attempts to kill another person, inflicts bodily injury, commits or threatens to commit a crime, or is armed with, uses, or threatens the use of a weapon. The consequences of a robbery charge can include the following:

  • Robbery in the Second Degree: 5 to 10 years in prison as well as a $150,000 fine.
  • Robbery in the First Degree: 10 to 20 years in jail.

It is important to note that, under the No Early Release Act, all robbery offenders are required to serve 85% of their sentence before they become eligible for parole.

Contact our Firm

If you are charged with upgraded domestic violence charges in New Jersey, you need strong legal defense that understands how to deal with these serious situations. Contact the Law Office of Carl Spector for dedicated representation. With over 30 years of experience as both a prosecutor and criminal defense attorney, he offers a unique perspective on how both sides think, and how to best approach each aspect of the case. When your future is on the line, don’t settle for less than the best possible legal representation. Contact an experienced New Jersey domestic violence lawyer that will aggressively fight for you. Call today for a free confidential consultation. Let our experience work for you.

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